Food Scene

Food Scene

One thing’s for sure. You won’t go hungry in Staunton

“The burgeoning restaurant scene has a distinctly locavore focus,” says the Washington Post.

Whether it is haute-cuisine or southern-style comfort food that you are looking for, we’ve got you covered. Staunton’s dining establishments are sizzling with a huge variety of culinary treats, from delicious melt-in-your-_mouth ribs to vegan-friendly meals, from European pastries to fresh baked bread, and from locally roasted coffee to artisanal chocolate.

Staunton’s restaurant scene is lively and is often profiled on the pages of national magazines, not only for its chefs but also for its farmers. Chef Ian Boden’s latest venture, The Shack, was recently named “One of The South’s Best New Restaurants” by Southern Living magazine – and it has also graced the pages of a wide array of top-tier publications, from Esquire magazine to the Wall Street Journal. Other restaurants and eateries winning praise from across the country range from the upscale southern-cuisine of Zynodoa to the 1950’s burger joint Wright’s Dairy Rite.

Amazingly, Staunton is currently home to three former chefs from the world-famous The Inn at Little Washington, all looking to make their mark on Staunton’s exploding culinary scene.

A vibrant selection of food-trucks, wine bars, and small-batch breweries round out the local flavor.

The city has long been on the forefront of the farm-to-table movement, due in part to our location in the agricultural mecca of Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. Joel Salatin, arguably America’s most famous farmer, lives a few miles from downtown Staunton at Polyface Farm. He and his farm rose to international fame when he was profiled in the best-selling book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma and the movie “Food, Inc.” Since then, Joel has been featured in Gourmet, Time, National Geographic, and Smithsonian magazines. Other local producers of note include Autumn Olive Farms, Harvest Thyme Herb Farm, and Malcolm’s Market Garden.

“The burgeoning restaurant scene has a distinctly locavore focus,” says the Washington Post.

Insider's Tip:
A producers-only farmer’s market occurs twice weekly in season (April-November) in Staunton’s Wharf district.
Insider's Tip:
A producers-only farmer’s market occurs twice weekly in season (April-November) in Staunton’s Wharf district.